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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 589 (some duplicates have been removed)
president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. includin
of the behaviors of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising. how would you feel if one of your children dated a jew? and heed, especially when i asked him about basic human rights for gays. >> do you really believe that someone is born homosexual? >> yes, i absolutely believe that an extraordinary hour. piers morgan tonight starts now. mr. president, we will come to new york. to new york. >> the creator, the almighty, the most gracious and the most merciful. good morning to you. i wish to greet all of the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your program. at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity toward me, don't transfer that on to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states and they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> the big catalyst for protests at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released which mocked the profit, mohammed. as a result, there was an attack, as you know, on the american embassy in ben zazi and libya. the ambassa
, this is "democracy now!" >> in egypt, the united states followed standard operating procedure. standard procedure when one of your favorite dictators gets into trouble. first, the support him as long as possible. but if it becomes really impossible, say the army turns against him, then you send him out to pasture and get the intellectual quest to issue declarations about your love of democracy, then try to restore the bill system as much as possible. >> "who owns the world?" with the presidential election less than two away, we turn to a major new address by noam chomsky on pressing topics not addressed in the president to campaign -- climate change, latin america's break with the united states, the arab spring, and the danger nuclear-weapons already pose in the middle east. >> israel refuses to allow inspections at all, refuses to join the non-proliferation treaty, has hundreds of nuclear weapons, advanced delivery system, and a long record of violence and repression. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are
in a conflict zone, a war zone, in a country where the united states may be very unpopular, people will relate to you as a human being. there will be local cultures of hospitality that take over and effectively protect you. you rely on your fellow human beings to look after you. often, as a foreigner, i am better taken care of by people in many places than if the same people i and interacting with were dealing with locals. >> what was the reaction to you as an american? >> it was ok. people are eager to meet an american, even when they are not happy to meet an american. they are polite. there was an occasion where i went to afghanistan to sit with a man who had been a notorious -- he was accused of being an opium trafficker. there was little doubt. he did not want to talk or see me. but it is afghanistan. i am his guest. he has to offer mitme tea. they spent the whole time complaining about the united states. this was 2002. even though they were very angry, they were going to give mime tea. i was going to walk away and be fine. people respond to you in that way. most people are friendlier than
his guest. he has to offer me tea. they spent the whole time complaining about the united states. this was 2002. even though they were very angry, they were going to give me tea. i was going to walk away and be fine. people respond to you in that way. most people are friendlier than that. most people invite you home and have a lot want to say. it is as if in many cases people had been thinking about the united states a lot. probably a lot more than we think about other countries. even though i am not an employee of the government, i am not an ambassador, it is as if i am the ambassador. they want the united states to know something. what their lives are like. they may have a specific message about a specific american policy, but they are very courteous and often are really energizing to meet. >> you said earlier you are from indiana and you went in to kentucky to college. >> i heard about it through various ways. they are a university that was founded in the coal mining country in eastern kentucky. the daughters who were coal minors had gone there for generations. they wanted mor
coverage of the debate. fareed zakaria gdp is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to awe of you around the united states and the world. i'm fareed zakaria. first up, kofi annan. the former secretary-general of the united nations and. i'll ask him whether there's any end in sight for that nation's brutal war, then the u.s. isn't the only major power picking a president for the next few weeks. i'll talk with beijing's reporter e van osnos. also i'll talk to the education innovator sal khan, the founder of khan academy about how best to teach our kids. >>> and what does a company with almost 700 planes and tens of thousands of trucks worry about? fuel. i'll sit down with fedex ceo fred smith to talk about the future of energy. that crucial subject, the future of energy is also at the heart of our latest gps special which airs tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. in global lessons, the roadmap for powering america will take you around the world to bring you ideas about energy back home. >>> but first here's my take. the
response be? >> some of the behaviors of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising? >> how would you feel if one of your children dates a jew? i asked him about basic human rights of gays. >> do you believe that some are born homosexual? >> i absolutely believe that. >>> mr. president, welcome to new york. many americans see you as public en enny enemy number one. >> translator: good morning to you. i wish to greet all the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your programming at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity towards me don't transfer that to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states. they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> the big catalyst for protest at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released whichocked the prophet. as a result there was an take on the american embassy. do you condemn his attack that caused his murder? >> translator: any action that is provocative offends the religious thoughts of
for the president of the united states. mitt romney is laying out his foreign policy platform in just about 20 minutes from now and we have the live cameras trained at the virginia military institute. will you hear him as he takes to the mic and possibly a global audience. you will hear it here on cnn and from our unmatched team of correspondents and analysts from d.c. to beijing to beirut. we have you completely covered and we'll begin with wolf blitz inner washington. when it comes to foreign policy credibility, the obama camp is comparing mitt romney to chevy chase and our most recent poll shows voters give the president a 7-point edge on world affairs. is a challenger, any challenger, be it mitt romney or anyone else, obliged to do this, obliged to become the commander in chief like more a moment and give a foreign policy speech right before the election? >> yes. mitt romney has been aggressively pursuing the foreign policy area because he thinks the president is vulnerable. yes, the president did manage to kill osama bin laden on his watch, but in certain other areas the romney folks if y
or anywhere in the united states and all they need is a computer and an internet connection with an auto dialer company and the auto dialer company then has a connection to carriers and the telephone network or. the auto dialer -- the lead generator is just trying to find people for these products or services for these rachel calls so they are just going to blast out calls. some of these lead generators are calling the phone book and going sequentially through numbers and looking for bodies a lot like e-mail spam because the costs are so much low for now. the startup costs are lower, almost zero as brett mentioned earlier. you can get dialing in a few hours and you don't need a pbx. you don't need lots of copper line and he don't even need a phone. you just need your computer and internet connection, so they will send out these calls going through an auto dialer which will put them into the telephone network and they will go out all over the country. and a very small percentage of people and up answering them in listening to the message and the message will be like one you may have heard
is running for the united states senate. you know very well by plan is my own. i have sought the expert opinions of those outside to get the brightest and the best and every word of that plan has been cited either in the online plan or in print. when you got into this race as the democrats at the thought -- as a democrat and you thought is going to be a coronation and now you are in a serious race with a serious woman. >> we're going to move on to the next question. >> in this tide of rising national debt, i was wondering about congressional earmarked. do you support elimination of them? here is one -- $1.9 million for a water taxi to pleasure beach in bridgeport. >> first call me respond to this last allegation. there is no doubt we'll look at her jobs plan, there are entire paragraphs and sentences lifted from the house republican website, from the cato institute. i don't know what you call it, but all i am saying is this is not a plan rooted in what best for the state of connecticut. this is a plan written by people in washington. when that mcmahon's idea that by simply giving a bunc
to accept the right of a sovereign state, a member of the united nations as a viable state, a state which is legitimate, is unacceptable from any point of view. from any aspect and angle whatsoever. we cannot accept the iranians will be allowed to legitimize another state whatever it is. and certainly not from our point of view not israel. they will have swallow two bitter pills not one. one pill will be the pill of the threat nuclear threat and the other will be the threat of accepting israel right to exist. despite the rhetoric we are hearing from teheran, i believe that many iranians in places of power understand that israel is here to stay. they realize that israel not going disappear as it will not disappear. and therefore, they will have to come terms with this reality. and these two elements means to say in order to achieve the aim, you have to find ways of giving them what did i say a few minutes ago? to resort to the use of dignity. it's a different good thing to do. it's very difficult. i'm not saying it's going to be easy. i think it's something we have to do. because we have t
priority of the united states is to maintain the safety of the united states. i will not cut the military by $1 trillion. which is a combination of the budget cuts the president has as well as the sequestration cuts. in my view, that is making our future less certain at less secure. >> this is not something that i proposed. it is something that congress propose. it will not happen. the budget that we are talking about is not reducing our military spending, it is maintaining it. governor romney has not spent enough time looking at how our military works. you look at the navy for example. we also have fewer horses and bayonets. the nature of our military has changed. we have these things called aircraft carrier's warplanes plan of them. -- where planes land on them. we have shipside go underwater and nuclear submarines. this is not a game of battleship where we are counting ships. it is, what are our capabilities? when i sit down with the secretary of the navy and the joint chiefs of staff, we determine how we will meet our faith with our troops. making sure that the veterans have the kind
the united states economy. the price and economic impact would be much greater if these occurred. we hope that this paper which is a departure from the focus of most papers on the consequences of a nuclear iran or a nuclear capable iran will trigger a new discussion and enable an expanded debate on the topic. i would like to introduce michael, the foreign policy director of the bpc, a former oil analyst to boot. he directed this effort and will review some of the key findings. he will introduce our very distinguished panel. mike. >> thank you, senator. thank you everyone for coming. as the senator said, the purpose of this report is really to trigger a debate. we are not suggesting that we have all of the answers, but we wanted to introduce a new dimension to the debate about iran about preventing a nuclear iran. we are not -- focusing on the economics, we are not suggesting the economic issues should drive united states policy one way or another. but it has definitely come up in the debate. it has been raised, certainly in terms of let us say about the impact on sanctions and military, s
. is in the interest of the united states to solve this and get a two-state solution to this? various members of this current administration have said so, and if that's true it would be good to succeed. there are others who are not so sure that it's achievable of that political capital is worth spending on a. that's an important question, important decision for the next administration is the next president wants to do this, he's going to have to build a domestic constituency to overcome opposition. on the question of the iran syria hezbollah act, the administration will have decisions to make about sanctions, about diplomacy, about war. if the iranian regime comes to the table with serious intent, for any reason, either because sanctions are fighting so hard or because they are threats of military strike, or for any other reason, my question as an individual is with the american government take yes for an answer, or will the american government have conditions that are, cannot be met by the other side? and with the administration even consider what was previously called grand bargain, which w
in order for us to invest in the united states and create jobs. >> we've got some good role models even though this roundtable -- business roundtable doesn't get involved and we don't even great legislators. my expense as a governor is a competitive state, our best teachers on political activist with the labor unions, and then later on george soros. he taught every wealthy individual american you can't afford to sit on the sidelines. and so i say go for it. >> we don't do endorsements either. we have a pack. we're very involved, and last week we launch a retail meets the vote campaign and will probably connect wit with a quar of a million retailers and millions of their employees. not endorsing, not to do that would give them voter guide, encouraging them to be in full. if we're going to address any of the issues, maybe we can get something done everything looks exactly the same. but there's a sense of people of a better understanding of our positions there's a greater likelihood we will get some action on them and that's why we've engaged our membership. >> let's go to questions from t
my life to continue that work is your united states senator. >> moderator: thank you. we hope this debate has subfolders as they ponder their decision and a selection only urge you to vote on election day. what you think our candidates, chris murphy and linda mcmahon and our reporter panel, al terzi, dennis house, keisha grant and mark davis if i could have your attention,e program on manufacturing society in the 21st century here at the institute. i welcome you on behalf of the institute both in the audience and those viewing remotely. i wanted to ask our president, walter isaacson, just to say a few words. it's always dangerous when your boss knows as much or more about the subject matter. >> that is definitely not true and that is why it is a pleasure to have tom here at the aspen institute because the one thing we do know about the issue of manufacturing is how important it is to america's economy and how ridiculous it is to try to think of a great economy that doesn't always have a healthy manufacturing sector. and so, when we were looking at the aspen institute and all t
of the united states ought not accept any soviet control over eastern europe. we ought to deal with each of these countries separately. we ought to pursue strategies with each of them, economic and the rest, that help them pull away from their dependence upon the soviet union. where the soviet union has acted irresponsibly, as they have in many of those countries, especially, recently, in poland, i believe we ought to insist that western credits extended to the soviet union bear the market rate. make the soviets pay for their irresponsibility. that is a very important objective -- to make certain that we continue to look forward to progress toward greater independence by these nations and work with each of them separately. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i'm not going to continue trying to respond to these repetitions of the falsehoods that have already been stated here. but with regard to whether mr. mondale would be strong, as he said he would be, i know that he has a commercial out where he's appearing on the deck of the nimitz and watching the f- 14's take off. and that's an
president of the united states to help and support this next week in this great nation and to make sure we maintain america as the hope of the earth's protective so much. >> gentlemen, thank you so much. that brings an end to this year's debates in the want to thank lynn university and its students. i leave you with the words of my mom said, go vote. good night. >> thank you. >> thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [applause] >> as we continue to watch the scene on the campus of lynn university, our phone lines are open. your reaction to this third and final debate. the focus, for policy. first up, rose, a supporter of mitt romney from nevada. good evening. ." >> i wanted to say something about the moderator. been one-sided, i think. i believe in governor romney and i hope people open their eyes and take notice of what's going on in our country. >> thank you for the call. on our twitter page, when you were saying -- and david, dayton, ohio. supporter of the president. >> go ahead. host>> i am
this serious occur in an administration and have a president of the united states in a situation like this say he didn't know? a president must know these things. i don't know which is worse, not knowing or knowing and not stopping it. and what about the mining of the harbors in nicaragua which violated international law? this has hurt this country, and a president's supposed to command. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i have so many things there to respond to, i'm going to pick out something you said earlier. you've been all over the country repeating something that, i will admit, the press has also been repeating-that i believed that nuclear misses could be fired and then called back. i never, ever conceived of such a thing. i never said any such thing. in a discussion of our strategic arms negotiations, i said that submarines carrying ssiles and airplanes carrying missiles we more conventional- type weapons, not as destabilizing as the land-based missiles, and that they were also weapons that -- or carriers-that if they were sent out and there was a change, you could call them back
.d.'s are coming from the united states, in our most complete engineering schools. that is a recipe for disaster. that is a recipe for disaster. we do not ever talk about it. we're just letting the thing unraveled. what about best new engineering schools, which you will be hearing about in a few days, in dallas, and they have a great school, but guess what -- i asked them onetime how many people they have from china, and this university right here, 2000, added to the top. >> this is an example of how we need to modernize our immigration policy and how we need to change education policy alice well. immigration policy is based on family relationships. it is not based on economic considerations, skills and knowledge. while we need to revitalize education for americans, we need to recognize the extent to which people are coming to america to learn we need to do what we need to do to keep them in america. >> this is our core problem. there trillions of connections in the brain called neurons. they start down at age 6 when they start public school. kids at a school soared like eagles, got college scho
in pakistan, 75% of the pakistani to identify the united states now as their enemy, not as their supporter or their allies. in many ways, we are seeing a very ill-conceived, irresponsible, and immoral or policy come back to haunt us where the united states foreign policies have been based, unfortunate, on brute military force and wars for oil. under my administration, we will have a foreign policy based on international law and human rights and the use of diplomacy. instead of fighting wars for oil, we will be leading, as america, a leading the fight to put an end to climate change. in afghanistan and iraq, we have spent about $5 trillion. we have seen thousands and thousands of american lives lost, hundreds of thousands of civilian lives lost, about $1 trillion a year being spent on a massive, bloated military, industrial security budget. instead, we need to cut the military budget, right sizes year 2000 levels, and build a true secured here at home, bringing our war dollars home. >> rocky anderson from the justice the party, yet two minutes. >> the question was whether the killings of th
that are investing right here in iowa, right here in the united states of america, rebuilding our manufacturing. [applause] i want to control more of our own energy. you heard last night oil production is up, natural gas production is up. we'vee've also said is got to develop a new source of energy and we've got to be more fisht with our economy. so we raised fuel efficiency on cars so your car will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. we had double the amount of renewable energy we generate from wind and solar and buy fuels. today the united states of america is less dependent on foreign oil than any time in the last two decades. so the question -- so the choice you have -- you heard last night, it's not a choice between oil versus solar or natural gas versus wind. we all agree we got to increase oil production and natural gas production. but the question is whether we build on the progress for the new energy source of the future. i'm not going to keep on giving corporate tax funded welfare to oil companies $4 billion a year when we could use that money to promote wind and solar and long-lastin
assistance today, we will be able to take a broad look at how the arab world is looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particul
tells well. the time i served in the united states senate i've been an independent voice for the people in the state and i've gotten results from the people of the state. in this campaign today, seven newspapers have made an editorial the as to who they would endorse. and all seven endorsed my candidacy. one of the reasons, not the only but one of the reasons that those newspapers endorsed me from the spread to california and a lot of places in between because of my record and the results that i achieved for the people in the state either leading the fight to cut the payroll tax for millions of americans and in pennsylvania so they could of dollars in the pocket to be doubled to invest in the economy, trade adjustment when the workers lose their jobs because of the unfair foreign competition and i let the fight pass that legislation given the training they need to get back on their feet. the so-called dredging plastic the deepening of the channels on was the key player in getting the most recent funding for that so getting results is key for the economy, and i have the honor to have ser
secretary of state of the united states, the hon. hillary rodham clinton. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you. it is wonderful to be back here at georgetown and at one of the most beautiful the news, not only in washington, but anywhere, to have this chance to talk with you about an issue that will definitely shape your future. and to share with you some thoughts about what that actually means. as the lancaster said, i am a hoya by marriage. i am so proud to be that and so grateful for the extraordinary contribution that the school of foreign service makes to the state department. we are in reached every single day, dean lancaster, but the work and scholarship that goes on here at this great university. so i came here because it is not only that young people have a great state in our policies at home and abroad about energy, but because we all have to work together to find answers to some of the challenges that it poses. energy cuts across the entirety of u.s. foreign policy. it is a matter of national security and global stability. it is at the heart of the global economy. it is a
there will be changes in the united states senate, if tim is in, he will be in there for the same folks he's campaigning for all of these years when he was chair of the democratic national committee, ignoring the needs, dire needs of people in virginia. i want to see change in washington, those positive, constructive ideas that can get this country going in the right direction. i believe we ought to get united behind the mission of sending a message to the world that america is open for business again. i think that anybody who pays taxes should be on our side unless you want to pay higher taxes. if you use electricity, you ought on our side. if you want more affordable electricity. if you drive a car and don't like the fact you're paying over $30 more every time you fill up, you ought to be on our side. if you agree with me doctors and patients ought to be making health care decisions rather then panels of bureaucrats up in washington, you ought to be on our side. if you're working for a living or if you want a job, the approach i have been advocating has proven to work. over 300,000 net new jobs create
in los angeles. william? >> well, shepard, these weapons sold in the united states and smuggled south continue to produce a staggering body count in mexico. brian terry was one victim. but now univision the spanish language network produced a bombshell documentary that puts a human face on this american scandal with guns traced to fast and furious killed 18 drug rehab center in juarez late in 2009. months later the cartel hit mass cerd 16 at a teenager's birthday party. >> they feel helpless. they don't know what to do and they say who is going to pay for this? by cross-referencing weapons weapons sold in mexico. hundreds of fatalities to the u.s. program. while the mexican government has offered little criticism of the u.s. administration from which it receives hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. the victims are hoping to find justice in u.s. courts. >> go and sue in the united states with these american lawyers. >> now attorney general eric holder did not fire anyone for fast and furious. we are told reviews internally are underway for about a dozen officials. inspector general
look for in the president of the united states of america. i'm proud that important military figures who are supporting me in this race, former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff john shalikashvili, just yesterday, general eisenhower's son, general john eisenhower, endorsed me, general admiral william crown, general tony mcbeak, who ran the air force war so effectively for his father -- all believe i would make a stronger commander in chief. and they believe it because they know i would not take my eye off of the goal, osama bin laden. unfortunately, he escaped in the mountains of tora bora. we had him surrounded. but we didn't use american forces, the best trained in the world, to go kill him. the president relied on afghan warlords and he outsourced that job too. that's wrong. >> new question, two minutes, senator kerry." colossal misjudgments." what colossal misjudgments, in your opinion, has president bush made in these areas? >> well, where do you want me to begin? first of all, he made the misjudgment of saying to america that he was going to build a true alliance, that he w
to iran in terms of views of the united states. so there's a very different dynamic on the ground among libyan youth. notwithstanding what we're seeing in the news. um, and i thought the uprising in benghazi was hugely a success, important to think about when 30,000 people rose up a few weekends ago to throw out islamist militias. the population once again taking control of the situation where a dysfunctional government wasn't able to. and i found the intervention very interesting because in many ways i think the main bogeyman was not the islamist militias, but the fear of what the 30,000 would do if things got much worse. which brings up another thing that i should have said in the introductory remarks, the arab spring, the dynamic, we view it as people against regimes, but just as important is regimes against regimes and people against people, and i'm happy to talk about those in the q&a, but it's not just people against regimes. following benghazi, a well known libyan academic said something which stuck with me. he said libyans have no idea where they're going, but they're going to g
powder with the maritime powers, like brittany is to be our today, the united states. and then, there is an american and he put these two ideas together. and where the two great powers, the land power and d.c. power come together, he called the shout about. and the middle east is located in one of the world's great shutterbugs. the interesting thing is about them is that small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other, simply because it depends on which side they're on or which side they decide to shift two. in the middle east, the old part with syria and is today. but, after the fall of the soviet union, after the end of the cold war, there was another heart. since the entire east were taking place at that time, when the circulation state joined the middle east, when afghanistan pushed the edge of the middle east. and so today, we have a second part inside the middle east and that is iran. and those two cards, with their particular allies are causing this growing second global cold war. now the first indication we have is that is the reincarna
to president obama for two years. >> no one in the united states, you know, less in japan and i hope in china wants to see shots fired over three or four uninhabited rocks in the east china sea. as long as we're concentrating on the sovereignty issue, we're probably not going to get anywhere. on the other hand, the resource issues can be addressed separately, without regard to sovereignty. >> bader says the u.s. government doesn't intend to mediate. he called on both sides to refrain from any action that could be considered a provocation. he argued the violent protests in china against japan's nationalization of the islands were counterproductive, unwise, and damaging to china itself. >> it made china look like an aggrieved third-world country that was not acting like an international community. >> japanese leaders say their claim to the senkaku islands dates back to 1895. chinese officials maintain their country was forced to give up the territory after losing the sino-japanese war. >>> the philippines and vietnam have appealed to the international community for a peaceful and legal resoluti
to stand by our allies. the tensions that exist between israel and the united states is very unfortunate. the defense program, of poland that was very unfortunate. that disrupted the that disrupted the relationship in some ways that really was -- existed between us. when the students took to the streets in tehran and the people protested and the green revolution occurred, for the president to be a silent was a mistake. we have to stand for our allies and stand for a stronger economy. >> america remains the one indispensable nation. the world needs a strong america. it is stronger now than when i came into office. we were able to refocus our attention not only on the terrorist threat, but also be getting a transition process in a afghanistan. it allowed us to refocus on the relationships that have been neglected for a decade. our alliances have never been stronger with asia, europe, africa, israel, where we have had an unprecedented military cooperation in dealing with rats. what we have been able to do is position ourselves so we can start rebuilding america. making sure we are pretty ma
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 589 (some duplicates have been removed)

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